CLMR
~formerly juliebeefjerky~

Hi, I'm Julie | Quezon City, PH

Reading:
The Secret History by Donna Tartt

art/writing blog which is serious but not really dyules
(1 of 698) — next

amortizing:

third wheeling two girls who are best friends is so much worse than third wheeling a couple

1 hour ago · 184527 · ©
risingandshining:

officialkia:

pennameverity:

This is Duolingo, a language-learning website/app that deserves some serious recognition. It offers over 10 languages for English speakers, as well as courses for non-English speakers around the world, and they’re in the process of adding more. 
But wait, I don’t want to do any more schoolwork! Not to worry little one, Duolingo is actually more like a game. You can compete with friends, and earn “lingots” (which are basically Duolingo money) to buy power-ups, extra activities, and bonus skills - like Flirting.

I’m already taking a language, what do I need this for? 
It’s not really a secret that most school language courses (in America, anyway) suck and only teach you to speak the language at about a third grader’s level. Which is why Duolingo is so freaking awesome.
Teachers can’t give every student individualized attention, but Duolingo can. If you’re not learning the way you want to or as much as you want to in the classroom, Duolingo is a really great resource. It’s easy, tailored to you, and really effective.

Duolingo tracks your progress and reminds you when you haven’t studied for a while or need a refresher on something. Already semi-fluent in a language? No problem, just take a shortcut to more advanced subjects or test out of the lesson. 
The lessons start with the basics (he, she, hello, thank you, etc) and move up to harder stuff. Duolingo focuses on vocabulary first, so you can learn the language and then the grammar that goes with it - much simpler than the system most schools use. It also tracks the number of words you’ve learned and how well you know them.

And you don’t even have to write out the flashcards!
Duolingo is perfect for reviewing everything you forgot over the summer or giving you the extra help you need. And if you’re trying to learn a language on your own, it’s fantastic - you don’t have to create your own lessons. Whether you’re trying to learn your second, third, or fifth language, I seriously recommend Duolingo.
Okay, what else?
Duolingo also has discussion boards, where you can ask for help with a hard lesson, make new friends, watch for updates, and share your achievements.
Even better is the Immersion feature. It won’t send you to Spain or France, but it’s pretty awesome. Duolingo takes real articles from the internet, which users translate. You can translate articles from your native language into the language you’re learning or vice versa, which gives you more experience and makes the Internet more universal.
You can suggest new languages and track Duolingo’s progress in creating new courses. Bilinguals (older than 13) can help to create these courses. Duolingo has a long list of courses that can be contributed to, like Punjabi, Hebrew, and Vietnamese. Oh, and Dothraki, Klingon, Sindarin, and Esperanto.
And the best part? IT’S COMPLETELY FREE. 
If you love languages or just want to pass French class this year, USE DUOLINGO. Download the app and practice a language while you wait for the bus instead of playing Angry Birds!

Coolest app I’ve ever downloaded.

Actually my favourite app!

risingandshining:

officialkia:

pennameverity:

This is Duolingo, a language-learning website/app that deserves some serious recognition. It offers over 10 languages for English speakers, as well as courses for non-English speakers around the world, and they’re in the process of adding more. 

But wait, I don’t want to do any more schoolwork! Not to worry little one, Duolingo is actually more like a game. You can compete with friends, and earn “lingots” (which are basically Duolingo money) to buy power-ups, extra activities, and bonus skills - like Flirting.

image

I’m already taking a language, what do I need this for? 

It’s not really a secret that most school language courses (in America, anyway) suck and only teach you to speak the language at about a third grader’s level. Which is why Duolingo is so freaking awesome.

Teachers can’t give every student individualized attention, but Duolingo can. If you’re not learning the way you want to or as much as you want to in the classroom, Duolingo is a really great resource. It’s easy, tailored to you, and really effective.

image

Duolingo tracks your progress and reminds you when you haven’t studied for a while or need a refresher on something. Already semi-fluent in a language? No problem, just take a shortcut to more advanced subjects or test out of the lesson. 

The lessons start with the basics (he, she, hello, thank you, etc) and move up to harder stuff. Duolingo focuses on vocabulary first, so you can learn the language and then the grammar that goes with it - much simpler than the system most schools use. It also tracks the number of words you’ve learned and how well you know them.

image

And you don’t even have to write out the flashcards!

Duolingo is perfect for reviewing everything you forgot over the summer or giving you the extra help you need. And if you’re trying to learn a language on your own, it’s fantastic - you don’t have to create your own lessons. Whether you’re trying to learn your second, third, or fifth language, I seriously recommend Duolingo.

Okay, what else?

Duolingo also has discussion boards, where you can ask for help with a hard lesson, make new friends, watch for updates, and share your achievements.

Even better is the Immersion feature. It won’t send you to Spain or France, but it’s pretty awesome. Duolingo takes real articles from the internet, which users translate. You can translate articles from your native language into the language you’re learning or vice versa, which gives you more experience and makes the Internet more universal.

You can suggest new languages and track Duolingo’s progress in creating new courses. Bilinguals (older than 13) can help to create these courses. Duolingo has a long list of courses that can be contributed to, like Punjabi, Hebrew, and Vietnamese. Oh, and Dothraki, Klingon, Sindarin, and Esperanto.

And the best part? IT’S COMPLETELY FREE. 

If you love languages or just want to pass French class this year, USE DUOLINGO. Download the app and practice a language while you wait for the bus instead of playing Angry Birds!

Coolest app I’ve ever downloaded.

Actually my favourite app!

23 hours ago · 141852 · ©

kehinki:

Trying to come off as a casual fan by calling him Captain America instead of Steve

1 day ago · 21528 · ©
1 day ago · 19381 · ©

Haru craving to touch Rin’s face from the start

1 day ago · 6543 · ©

babyhaims:

*sees dog* that is the most beautiful dog i’ve ever seen
*sees another dog* that is the most beautiful dog i’ve ever seen
*sees third dog* that is the most beautiful dog i’ve ever s

1 day ago · 28971 · ©
sunsunnywink:

エッ@HG

sunsunnywink:

エッ@HG
1 day ago · 8251 · ©
waywardandwanderlust:

heartsandmagic:

Cat doesn’t know what to do with the butterfly that flew on its paw.

I can’t breathe I’m laughing too hard

waywardandwanderlust:

heartsandmagic:

Cat doesn’t know what to do with the butterfly that flew on its paw.

I can’t breathe I’m laughing too hard

1 day ago · 375233 · ©

*sweats* sorry i haven’t been on tumblr in so long, i’ve been having fun on twitter…. also sorry for all the free! i’ve been reblogging, i swear i’m gonna clean up my act

bana05:

fishnbanjos:

thebicker:

spinsterprivilege:

lianabrooks:

britegreenstar:

libraryadvocates:

lalie:

The fact that the ALA shared this link is so gloriously bitter and angry and I love it.

Is there a portmanteau for that? Angritter? Bangry? 

My library card already gets me multiple “real” books, e-books, audiobooks, magazines and movies per month. For free.

Kindle Unlimited offers nothing from big presses, and no guarantee the authors will get paid fairly for their work. Libraries buy the book up front for a higher price (and a better binding). Kindle Unlimited offers the authors a variable percentage of a as-yet-undetermined-and-unannounced amount of money. 
While Amazon touts Kindle Unlimited at “Netflix For Books!” the reality is Netflix signed contracts with everyone whose work they offer so that actors, screen writers, best boys, and the rest of those people get paid for the shows and movies you watch. Amazon does not.
That means your favorite author isn’t being compensated for their time or work. If you love a book series and want to see the next one get published: buy the book or hit the library. Starving authors quit writing because they like eating. 

Not only is your favorite author not being compensated for their work, but the editors who help shape your favorite author’s work, the marketing departments who work really, incredibly hard at getting the word out for their authors (in an increasingly glutted marketplace and often, in smaller and mid-sized houses, with low budgets), the designers who create beautiful covers and carefully lay out the interiors of your favorite books so that you can read them easily, etc etc also all lose out when Amazon strong arms publishers into giving them huge discounts that can—and have!—put small publishers (particularly vulnerable ones like LGBTQ and feminist presses) completely out of business.

I really, really encourage everyone to do the following two things:
1) Order books from Powell’s, not Amazon. I bought Edan Lepucki’s “California” from them, and they offer flat $4.95 shipping on orders under $50, and free shipping on orders over $50. They have used and new books and they offer discounts on big sellers. The prices aren’t AS low as Amazon but they’re comparable. I know it’s impossible to completely eliminate buying things on Amazon, but at least try a little bit.
2) Check out your local library. I lived in LA for about 6 years before checking out the LA Public Library System. I was a fool! Now I get ebooks on my Kindle without ever having to go to the library. (pssst - If you don’t finish the book in the three weeks you have it on loan, turn off your Kindle’s wifi and it won’t go away.) I pick up physical books at the location less than a mile from me. I get audiobooks for long drives. I still buy physical books that I want to have for more than three weeks, but for most of my reading, the library is the way to go. If you’re cynical, think of it as getting a better return on investment from your tax dollars.

The first thing I thought was this is what the library does already. Honestly, 60 percent of the ebooks I read are through my library. They actually get new books at a good rate too. 

And just think about how much worse it is for self-published authors. Like, we have no choice in the matter - we’re automatically signed up for some of these things; and while there is a “cache” for royalty payments, it’d piddly. It’s a catch-22 for self-published authors because Amazon IS where everyone goes for books, but it’s at a very huge cost. It’s frustrating, really.

bana05:

fishnbanjos:

thebicker:

spinsterprivilege:

lianabrooks:

britegreenstar:

libraryadvocates:

lalie:

The fact that the ALA shared this link is so gloriously bitter and angry and I love it.

Is there a portmanteau for that? Angritter? Bangry? 

My library card already gets me multiple “real” books, e-books, audiobooks, magazines and movies per month. For free.

Kindle Unlimited offers nothing from big presses, and no guarantee the authors will get paid fairly for their work. Libraries buy the book up front for a higher price (and a better binding). Kindle Unlimited offers the authors a variable percentage of a as-yet-undetermined-and-unannounced amount of money. 

While Amazon touts Kindle Unlimited at “Netflix For Books!” the reality is Netflix signed contracts with everyone whose work they offer so that actors, screen writers, best boys, and the rest of those people get paid for the shows and movies you watch. Amazon does not.

That means your favorite author isn’t being compensated for their time or work. If you love a book series and want to see the next one get published: buy the book or hit the library. Starving authors quit writing because they like eating. 

Not only is your favorite author not being compensated for their work, but the editors who help shape your favorite author’s work, the marketing departments who work really, incredibly hard at getting the word out for their authors (in an increasingly glutted marketplace and often, in smaller and mid-sized houses, with low budgets), the designers who create beautiful covers and carefully lay out the interiors of your favorite books so that you can read them easily, etc etc also all lose out when Amazon strong arms publishers into giving them huge discounts that can—and have!—put small publishers (particularly vulnerable ones like LGBTQ and feminist presses) completely out of business.

I really, really encourage everyone to do the following two things:

1) Order books from Powell’s, not Amazon. I bought Edan Lepucki’s “California” from them, and they offer flat $4.95 shipping on orders under $50, and free shipping on orders over $50. They have used and new books and they offer discounts on big sellers. The prices aren’t AS low as Amazon but they’re comparable. I know it’s impossible to completely eliminate buying things on Amazon, but at least try a little bit.

2) Check out your local library. I lived in LA for about 6 years before checking out the LA Public Library System. I was a fool! Now I get ebooks on my Kindle without ever having to go to the library. (pssst - If you don’t finish the book in the three weeks you have it on loan, turn off your Kindle’s wifi and it won’t go away.) I pick up physical books at the location less than a mile from me. I get audiobooks for long drives. I still buy physical books that I want to have for more than three weeks, but for most of my reading, the library is the way to go. If you’re cynical, think of it as getting a better return on investment from your tax dollars.

The first thing I thought was this is what the library does already. Honestly, 60 percent of the ebooks I read are through my library. They actually get new books at a good rate too. 

And just think about how much worse it is for self-published authors. Like, we have no choice in the matter - we’re automatically signed up for some of these things; and while there is a “cache” for royalty payments, it’d piddly. It’s a catch-22 for self-published authors because Amazon IS where everyone goes for books, but it’s at a very huge cost. It’s frustrating, really.

2 days ago · 22026 · ©